Four Things You Need to Know this Halloween in Calgary

Halloween is celebrated in Canada on October 31st or around the time leading up to this day. The occasion has Celtic origins and according to Celtic beliefs, spirits and the dead cross over into the world of the living on this night.

To celebrate, many people host costume parties, carve pumpkins, make Halloween themed treats and decorate their houses. Many children go ‘trick-or-treating’, where they dress up in their costumes and ring doorbells in their neighborhood.

Here are four things you don’t want to miss out on this Halloween in Calgary:

  1. Halloween Swim Coupons
    You can treat your treat your trick-or-treaters with a coupon (Ages 2-17 years) for a free swim at a Calgary facility! For more information please visit here.
  1. Halloween Boo Bags at North Mount Pleasant Arts Centre, October 28
    Decorating a Halloween Boo bag with your kids at North Mount Pleasant Arts Centre. To register, call 403-221-3682. This activity takes place on October 28, from 4:30pm to 6:00pm.
  1. Monster Mash Halloween Bash at Village Square, October 28
    A family-friendly Halloween event with free creepy crafts, games, and activities. It takes place at Village Square on October 28, from 4:30pm to 6:30pm.
  1. Cemetery Tour, Oct 29
    A free cemetery tour before Halloween. It  takes place at the Galloway House on Saturday, October 29, at 2:00pm.

Staying safe while enjoying your Halloween! Here are some Halloween safety tips provided by the City of Calgary

Source: http://www.calgarycitynews.com/2016/10/4-things-you-need-to-know-this-halloween.html

Happy Hanukkah

Hanukkah – also known as the “Festival of Lights” or the “Festival of Dedication” – is a Jewish Festival, starting on the 25th day of Kislev, according to the Hebrew calendar. It lasts for eight days. In 2015, Hanukkah begins at sunset on Sunday, December 6, and ends on Monday, December 14.

Lighting candles is one of the important Hanukkah traditions. Candles are placed in the nine-branched Hanukkah menorah. One candle is lit each night of Hanukkah, and the ninth candle is lit every night. During the festival, traditional foods including oily jelly-filled doughnuts and potato pancakes are especially popular. Many families exchange gifts each of the holiday’s night.

 

Clocks go back one hour on Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2:00 am

Daylight Saving Time (DST), or summer time ends on Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2:00 a.m. Clocks are set back one hour. The changes will affect many cities in Canada. The main purpose of Daylight Saving Time is to save energy and make better use of the natural daylight. It was first put into practice by the German government in 1916. Before 1918, five Canadian cities used Daylight Saving Time [Wikipedia]. In Canada, Daylight Saving Time usually has been regulated by the provincial and territorial governments.

October 31, 2015 Halloween

Halloween is celebrated in Canada on October 31st or around the time leading up to this day. The occasion has Celtic origins and according to Celtic beliefs, spirits and the dead cross over into the world of the living on this night. To celebrate, many people host costume parties, carve pumpkins, make Halloween themed treats and decorate their houses. Many children go ‘trick-or-treating’, where they dress up in their costumes and ring doorbells in their neighborhood. The children call out “trick-or-treat” to receive candy or snacks from the person answering the door. Halloween is not a public holiday, so schools, organizations, and other businesses open as usual.

Did you know? – Cultural Fact

Languages of Africa

Overview: 1,250 to 3,000 languages

7 major language families:

  • Afro Asiatic
  • Nilo Saharan
  • Niger Congo A
  • Niger Congo B (Bantu)
  • Khoisan
  • Austronesian
  • Indo- European

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Nilo-Saharian languages

Where: Central and Eastern Africa

What: 140 languages spoken

Who: 11 million people

Examples: Luo, Kanuri, Songhay,

Nubian, Dinka, Nuer, Maasai, Fur

 

Niger-Congo languages

Where: Two thirds of Africa

What: 1000 languages spoken

Who: 200 million people

Examples: Swahili, Yoruba, Igbo,

Fulani, Shona and Zulu