How to Maintain Good “Work-From-Home” Posture

Lisa Cai COVID-19, Daily Life

What is a good sitting posture?

– Chin: Your chin should be parallel to the floor. Instead of jutting it forward, tuck it down slightly.

– Shoulders: Relax your shoulders down your back and open up your chest.

– Arms: When you work and rest your forearms on the top of a desk, they should be parallel to the floor.

– Stomach: Tightening the muscles on your belly a bit. This will help support your lower back.

– Back: Don’t flex or arch your spine. Lean back at a small angle of up to 135 degrees.

– Legs: Don’t cross your legs. Both thighs should be parallel to the floor.

– Knees: Your knees should be at the level of your hips, and point straight ahead.

– Feet: Don’t dangle your feet from the chair. Place them flat on the floor. If they don’t reach the floor, adjust the height of your chair or use a footrest.

 

Tips on keeping a good sitting posture while working from home

  1. Chair.

Get a chair with a height adjustment.

Ask a family member to take a photo of you sitting. Check if your spine is in its natural S-shape.

Add a cushion or rolled-up blanket to support your lower back.

  1. Distance is the key.

Your keyboard and mouse should be about 8- 10cm from the edge of your desk.

The top of your computer monitor should be about one arm’s length away, at your eye level.

If you are working on a laptop, try raising it to your eye level using something like books or a shoebox.

If you need to look at documents, try placing them on a book holder to prevent you from hunching over.

  1. Move around frequently.

Move around, change positions frequently, and switch between sitting and standing.

Set a timer to remind yourself of taking regular breaks.

Get out of your chair every 30-45 minutes to stretch.

  1. Work in a standing position.

You can get a standing workstation, but it can be costly.

Try a makeshift standing workstation by placing your computer on a bench or your kitchen counter

Work standing up for 15 or 20 minutes every 1 to 2 hours.

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References:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/apr/21/home-office-ergonomics-how-to-work-from-home-without-breaking-your-back

https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/22/health/poor-posture-work-from-home-remote-wellness/index.html

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/why-good-posture-matters

https://bodyandhealth.canada.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/why-good-posture-matters