Cut and Dried

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Cut and Dried. What does “cut and dried” mean? Clear and definite Done and completed Settled, decided, and unlikely to change How to use it? “Cut and dried” is used to describe a situation, solution, or plan. You can use it as a predicate adjective, which modifies …

Common Uncountable Nouns

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In the first article of our new series “English Learning Tips for Newcomers“. English learners tend to overuse plural forms on uncountable nouns. Uncountable nouns are nouns that cannot be counted, e.g. water, weather, air, etc. Most uncountable nouns are liquid, abstract concept, mass nouns, states of being, or feelings. Here are 10 uncountable nouns which English learners tend to …

Throw … under the Bus

Lisa C. Uncategorized

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Throw (someone) under the Bus.  What does “throw (someone) under the bus” mean?  to betray someone you know to save oneself  to criticize or blame someone in order to gain an advantage  to do something harmful to someone else for self-benefits  How to use it?  The “someone” …

Cool as A Cucumber

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Cool as A Cucumber. What does “cool as a cucumber” mean? Very calm, collected or unemotional when faced with something surprising Composed or self-possessed in times of stress The origin of “cool as a cucumber”: The inside of cucumbers remains cooler than the air even in extremely …

Sweep…under the Rug

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression Sweep (something) under the Rug. What does it mean to “sweep something under the rug”? To hide or ignore something embarrassing, unpleasant, illegal, damaging or wrong. What’s the origin of “sweeping something under the rug”? The origin is quite self-explanatory. You sweep dust under the rug, so …

Up One’s Sleeve

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression Up One’s Sleeve. What does “up one’s sleeve” mean? to have secret ideas to be secretly ready with plans to have a hidden fallback plan that is likely to ensure success What’s the origin of “up one’s sleeve”? Magicians always keep tricks up their sleeves. Card players, …