Blow Out of the Water

Nicole H. Daily Life, Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: blow out of the water. What does “blow out of the water” mean? • To destroy or defeat something or someone completely• To thoroughly impress, overwhelm, or excite someone Examples: • He won every tennis game we played. His performance blew mine out of the water.• That …

Be Put or Go through the Wringer

Lisa C. Daily Life, Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Be Put or Go through the Wringer. What does “be put/go through the wringer” mean? to go through difficulty, punishment, or unpleasant experience. Examples: The internal investigation has really put the officer through the wringer. Between losing her job, and divorce hearings, the foreclosure of her house, …

The Tide Has Turned

Lisa C. Daily Life, Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: The Tide Has Turned. What does “the tide has turned” mean? one’s luck has changed, especially for the better things has began to change in favor of someone or something How to use it? This idiom is quite flexible. Use this idiom as a sentence, which can be in different tenses depending on the context. …

Double Take

Lisa C. Daily Life, Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Double Take. What does “Double Take” mean? a delayed surprised reaction at seeing something or someone a surprised second look at a something whose significance wasn’t completed grasped at first How to use “Double Take”? Use it in this phrase Do a double take Examples: I did …

Get a Word in Edgewise

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Get a Word in Edgewise. What does “get a word in edgewise” mean? To have an opportunity to speak To successfully interrupt a conversation in which someone else is talking nonstop How to use “get a word in edgewise”? This phrase is usually used with a negative …

To Split Hairs

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: To Split Hairs What does “to split hairs” mean? To find fault, to nitpick or quibble about something small and unimportant Make unnecessary, tiny distinctions between things Argue about small and unimportant details of something How to use it? Add “about…” or “over…” after it, to indicate …

Cut and Dried

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In today’s “English Idioms for Newcomers“, let’s take a look at this expression: Cut and Dried. What does “cut and dried” mean? Clear and definite Done and completed Settled, decided, and unlikely to change How to use it? “Cut and dried” is used to describe a situation, solution, or plan. You can use it as a predicate adjective, which modifies …

Common Uncountable Nouns

Lisa C. Newcomer Information

In the first article of our new series “English Learning Tips for Newcomers“. English learners tend to overuse plural forms on uncountable nouns. Uncountable nouns are nouns that cannot be counted, e.g. water, weather, air, etc. Most uncountable nouns are liquid, abstract concept, mass nouns, states of being, or feelings. Here are 10 uncountable nouns which English learners tend to …